City. Life. Change.

   A blog about city planning, urban design, history, sociology and cooking. As a passionate chef, photos of completed dishes will be included. Photography and articles can be discovered here as well. She lives in Oakland, CA.

"I was just going to put some blogs on the bloggity bog and then! This happens!"
— 1 day ago with 29 notes
fastcompany:

Tell a caffeine addict she can’t drink a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and things could get a little ugly—or maybe not.
Coffee is more than just a fetishized drink or a daily ritual. It has the power to transform your productivity. But maybe we’ve been going about it all wrong.
Researcher Steven Miller of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesada found that because our bodies already produce natural hormones that make us feel more alert at certain times in the day, we should curb our caffeine consumption during these times so as not to diminish its effect when we need it most.
He found that the best times to drink coffee (or any caffeinated beverage) for those who wake up between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. is from 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. and between 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., since this is when our cortisol levels usually drop off and we begin to feel sluggish.
In other words, having a cup of coffee when you first get up doesn’t actually make you feel more awake.
While the science behind this seemed pretty sound, we wanted to know if the payoff for adjusting our coffee consumption is worth the sacrifice. Some were able to pull it off and loved the results, while others weren’t even able to make a dent in the challenge.
Here’s what happened>

fastcompany:

Tell a caffeine addict she can’t drink a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and things could get a little ugly—or maybe not.

Coffee is more than just a fetishized drink or a daily ritual. It has the power to transform your productivity. But maybe we’ve been going about it all wrong.

Researcher Steven Miller of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesada found that because our bodies already produce natural hormones that make us feel more alert at certain times in the day, we should curb our caffeine consumption during these times so as not to diminish its effect when we need it most.

He found that the best times to drink coffee (or any caffeinated beverage) for those who wake up between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. is from 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. and between 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., since this is when our cortisol levels usually drop off and we begin to feel sluggish.

In other words, having a cup of coffee when you first get up doesn’t actually make you feel more awake.

While the science behind this seemed pretty sound, we wanted to know if the payoff for adjusting our coffee consumption is worth the sacrifice. Some were able to pull it off and loved the results, while others weren’t even able to make a dent in the challenge.

Here’s what happened>

— 1 day ago with 95 notes
#coffee science  #know how  #thanks 
theparisreview:

Before Moby-Dick there was Mocha Dick—not a coffee-chocolate phallus but “a real-life whale … who fought off whalers for decades before being killed by harpoon.” It was a magazine story about Mocha that inspired Melville to write his novel; now, in a new illustrated book, Mocha Dick: The Legend and the Fury, the original whale gets his due.
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Before Moby-Dick there was Mocha Dick—not a coffee-chocolate phallus but “a real-life whale … who fought off whalers for decades before being killed by harpoon.” It was a magazine story about Mocha that inspired Melville to write his novel; now, in a new illustrated book, Mocha Dick: The Legend and the Fury, the original whale gets his due.

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

— 1 day ago with 239 notes
#fighting whales 
pewresearch:

Worldwide, the number of people 65 and older is projected to triple by mid-century, from 531 million in 2010 to 1.5 billion in 2050. In the U.S., the population of seniors is expected to slightly more than double, from 41 to 86 million.
See more projections for the global population in 2050.

pewresearch:

Worldwide, the number of people 65 and older is projected to triple by mid-century, from 531 million in 2010 to 1.5 billion in 2050. In the U.S., the population of seniors is expected to slightly more than double, from 41 to 86 million.

See more projections for the global population in 2050.

— 1 day ago with 15 notes
#budgets  #aging  #populations 
Why Restaurant And Hotel Workers May Soon Get A Raise

planetmoney:

image

Job postings are growing way faster than hires in restaurants and hotels. With time, this might lead to pay raises for an industry known for its low wages. 

Check it out: http://n.pr/1neDvjS

— 1 day ago with 44 notes
#hires  #money money  #wages 
artsfortransit:

Happy Friday! Please enjoy some mosaic characters from artist Jane Dickson’s Revelers, a permanent artwork at the Times Square-42nd Street station.

artsfortransit:

Happy Friday! Please enjoy some mosaic characters from artist Jane Dickson’s Revelers, a permanent artwork at the Times Square-42nd Street station.

— 1 day ago with 53 notes
#times square  #art in transit  #nice 
historicaltimes:

Paul Newman at the Venice Film Festival in 1963, age 38, to promote Hud.

historicaltimes:

Paul Newman at the Venice Film Festival in 1963, age 38, to promote Hud.

— 1 day ago with 290 notes
#classic cool