City. Life. Change.

   A blog about city planning, urban design, landscape architecture, history and sociology. It includes photography and
articles. Off topic yet noteworthy items will be added for inspiration. She lives in Oakland, CA.

historicaltimes:

Cromwell Road London, 26 Jun 1906. A maid taking a break.

historicaltimes:

Cromwell Road London, 26 Jun 1906. A maid taking a break.

— 13 hours ago with 68 notes
ancientart:

The Poulnabrone Dolmen, County Clare, Ireland. Classified as a portal tomb, this structure dates to the Neolithic period, radiocarbon dates place its use between 3,800 - 3,600 BCE.
During excavations the skeletal remains of up to 22 prehistoric individual were found, which included both adults and children, as well as one newborn. Extensive specialist analysis has been done on these remains, offering us a rare insight into the lives of these Neolithic people. 

[…] A variety of artefacts, presumably representing grave goods, were also recovered from the burial chamber. These included a polished stone axe, two stone beads, a decorated bone pendant, a fragment of a mushroom-headed bone pin, two quartz crystals, several sherds of coarse pottery, three chert arrowheads and three chert/flint scrapers.
The burial evidence from Poulnabrone has given us rare glimpse into the lives of our early ancestors. It appears that they endured a relatively tough existence, that involved hard physical labour, childhood illnesses, occasional violent attacks and early deaths. Although only a small section of the community were deemed worthy of burial in the tomb, there is little evidence for gender or age discrimination, with both male and female remains present as well as young and old. Prior to interment their bones appear to have been stored elsewhere and this may indicate that they were venerated as ancestor relics. Why certain individuals were chosen to be buried in the seemingly exalted location of a megalithic tomb, however, remains a mystery. 
-Irish Archaeology

Photo courtesy of & taken by Nicolas Raymond.

ancientart:

The Poulnabrone Dolmen, County Clare, Ireland. Classified as a portal tomb, this structure dates to the Neolithic period, radiocarbon dates place its use between 3,800 - 3,600 BCE.

During excavations the skeletal remains of up to 22 prehistoric individual were found, which included both adults and children, as well as one newborn. Extensive specialist analysis has been done on these remains, offering us a rare insight into the lives of these Neolithic people. 

[…] A variety of artefacts, presumably representing grave goods, were also recovered from the burial chamber. These included a polished stone axe, two stone beads, a decorated bone pendant, a fragment of a mushroom-headed bone pin, two quartz crystals, several sherds of coarse pottery, three chert arrowheads and three chert/flint scrapers.

The burial evidence from Poulnabrone has given us rare glimpse into the lives of our early ancestors. It appears that they endured a relatively tough existence, that involved hard physical labour, childhood illnesses, occasional violent attacks and early deaths. Although only a small section of the community were deemed worthy of burial in the tomb, there is little evidence for gender or age discrimination, with both male and female remains present as well as young and old. Prior to interment their bones appear to have been stored elsewhere and this may indicate that they were venerated as ancestor relics. Why certain individuals were chosen to be buried in the seemingly exalted location of a megalithic tomb, however, remains a mystery. 

-Irish Archaeology

Photo courtesy of & taken by Nicolas Raymond.

(via irish-history)

— 13 hours ago with 1309 notes
#dolmen  #country clare  #history  #ireland  #tombs 

newyorker:

The photographer George Steinmetz travelled to central England to photograph Stonehenge during the vernal equinox, one of four open-access days during which pilgrims can walk around the site: http://nyr.kr/1tie3zC

In this week’s magazine, Laura Miller joins a group of Druids on a trip to Stonehenge to celebrate the Winter Solstice, another open-access day (subscription required): http://nyr.kr/1hR6lZE

Top: Pagans, druids, and other self-styled mystics gather at the site for this year’s vernal equinox, on March 20th, an occasion that drew thousands of visitors. The woman pictured here is a member of a group called the Loyal Arthurian Warband.
Bottom: The day after the equinox, Salisbury Plain’s often inclement weather gave way to sun.

(Source: newyorker.com)

— 1 day ago with 340 notes
#seasons  #rituals of spring  #marking time  #stones  #england 
How Americans Die, By the Numbers →

(Source: pewresearch)

— 1 day ago with 63 notes
#die better  #deaths  #counts 
design-is-fine:

Hans-Simon Holtzbecker, Narcissus, 1649-1659. Gouache on vellum, in Gottorfer Codex. Germany. Via wiki.

design-is-fine:

Hans-Simon Holtzbecker, Narcissus, 1649-1659. Gouache on vellum, in Gottorfer Codex. Germany. Via wiki.

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

— 1 day ago with 137 notes
#flowers of spring 
Attention South Bay planners and transportation enthusiasts!Join YPG and Young Planners in Transportation (YPT) next Thursday April 24th at San Pedro Square Market (87 N San Pedro St, San Jose) from 6.30-8.30pm for a happy hour mixer to connect with fellow planners in the south bay and/or to check out a very cool public space. Look for us at the San Pedro Square Market Bar.

Attention South Bay planners and transportation enthusiasts!

Join YPG and Young Planners in Transportation (YPT) next Thursday April 24th at San Pedro Square Market (87 N San Pedro St, San Jose) from 6.30-8.30pm for a happy hour mixer to connect with fellow planners in the south bay and/or to check out a very cool public space. Look for us at the San Pedro Square Market Bar.

— 1 day ago
#San Pedro Market Bar  #April 24  #San Jose  #mapping  #night events  #planning  #urbanism  #design  #transit  #community  #fun times  #bay area